May 202016
 
Image Captions:KRevelers roll “The Rabbit” into starting position for the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade. Crafted by Ben Blacow and Marky Pierson of Wonderdog Studios, the towering sculpture is made from recycled wood and foam, shaped recycled copper, metal pans, builders paper and other materials and is a replica of a sculpture created by Papio, a Key Largo-based welder-turned artist who explored recycled materials long before it was considered hip to be rusty. The zany spectacle of creative whimsy and kinetic savvy was supported in part by a prestigious Knight Arts Challenge People's Choice Award and a Community Foundation of the Florida Keys grant.  A permanent exhibit celebrating Papio’s work is now open at Fort East Martello Museum in Key West, and preparations are already underway for next year’s kinetic festivities.  Visit KWAHS.ORG for more information.

KRevelers roll “The Rabbit” into starting position for the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade. Crafted by Ben Blacow and Marky Pierson of Wonderdog Studios, the towering sculpture is made from recycled wood and foam, shaped recycled copper, metal pans, builders paper and other materials and is a replica of a sculpture created by Papio, a Key Largo-based welder-turned artist who explored recycled materials long before it was considered hip to be rusty. The zany spectacle of creative whimsy and kinetic savvy was supported in part by a prestigious Knight Arts Challenge People’s Choice Award and a Community Foundation of the Florida Keys grant. A permanent exhibit celebrating Papio’s work is now open at Fort East Martello Museum in Key West, and preparations are already underway for next year’s kinetic festivities. Visit KWAHS.ORG for more information.

 

“Awesoma, the Narwhal Queen” – a kinetic float sculpture made from a three-wheeled trike covered in a wide variety of reused and recycled items including plastic water bottles, music cd’s, soda and beer cans, mattress springs, satellite dishes, tulle fabric and wine corks—wheels down Duval Street during the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade. The queen of the cavalcade was one of more than thirty kinetic creations that participated in the rolling cavalcade held in honor of late Florida Keys folk artist Stanley Papio and won cash prizes with the Green Machine Award for most recycled materials and the KWAHS Golden Papio Award. The zany spectacle of creative whimsy and kinetic savvy was supported in part by a prestigious Knight Arts Challenge People's Choice Award and a Community Foundation of the Florida Keys grant.  A permanent exhibit celebrating Papio’s work is now open at Fort East Martello Museum in Key West, and preparations are already underway for next year’s kinetic festivities.  Visit KWAHS.ORG for more information.

“Awesoma, the Narwhal Queen” – a kinetic float sculpture made from a three-wheeled trike covered in a wide variety of reused and recycled items including plastic water bottles, music cd’s, soda and beer cans, mattress springs, satellite dishes, tulle fabric and wine corks—wheels down Duval Street during the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade. The queen of the cavalcade was one of more than thirty kinetic creations that participated in the rolling cavalcade held in honor of late Florida Keys folk artist Stanley Papio and won cash prizes with the Green Machine Award for most recycled materials and the KWAHS Golden Papio Award.

 

Steve King rolls down Duval Street aboard his pedal-and-belt-driven creation “Time Chaser” during Saturday’s inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade, which honors late Florida Keys artist Stanley Papio, a rebellious welder-turned artist who explored recycled materials long before it was hip to be rusty.  Following in the pioneering folk artist’s footsteps, King used recycled materials combining wood, metal, bike parts, and “bits and bobs” to make his award-winning gear-and-cogs-inspired design, one of more than thirty kinetic creations that participated in the rolling cavalcade held in honor of the late welder-turned artist. The zany spectacle of creative whimsy and kinetic savvy was supported in part by a prestigious Knight Arts Challenge People's Choice Award and a Community Foundation of the Florida Keys grant. A permanent exhibit celebrating Papio’s work is now open at Fort East Martello Museum in Key West, and preparations are already underway for next year’s kinetic festivities.  Visit KWAHS.ORG for more information.

Steve King rolls down Duval Street aboard his pedal-and-belt-driven creation “Time Chaser” during Saturday’s inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade, which honors late Florida Keys artist Stanley Papio, a rebellious welder-turned artist who explored recycled materials long before it was hip to be rusty. Following in the pioneering folk artist’s footsteps, King used recycled materials combining wood, metal, bike parts, and “bits and bobs” to make his award-winning gear-and-cogs-inspired design, one of more than thirty kinetic creations that participated in the rolling cavalcade held in honor of the late welder-turned artist.

 

Virginia Wark pilots “Whirly-Giggles down Duval Street on Saturday during the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade. The fantastically festooned art bike was one of more than thirty kinetic creations to participate in the zany spectacle of creative whimsy and kinetic savvy held in honor of Florida Keys folk artist Stanley Papio, a rebellious welder-turned artist who explored recycled materials long before it was hip to be rusty. The parade was supported in part by a prestigious Knight Arts Challenge People's Choice Award and a Community Foundation of the Florida Keys grant.  A permanent exhibit celebrating Papio’s work is now open at Fort East Martello Museum in Key West, and preparations are already underway for next year’s kinetic festivities.  Visit KWAHS.ORG for more information.

Virginia Wark pilots “Whirly-Giggles down Duval Street on Saturday during the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade. The fantastically festooned art bike was one of more than thirty kinetic creations to participate in the zany spectacle of creative whimsy and kinetic savvy held in honor of Florida Keys folk artist Stanley Papio, a rebellious welder-turned artist who explored recycled materials long before it was hip to be rusty.

 

Key West Montessori Charter School Principal Lynn Barras, Ed.M., pilots the “Peace Dove” past the Custom House Museum on Saturday. Crafted of nearly 100% recycled materials and “feathers” made from milk jugs, the fabulous fowl was one of more than thirty kinetic creations that participated in the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade. The zany spectacle of creative whimsy and kinetic savvy was supported in part by a prestigious Knight Arts Challenge People's Choice Award and a Community Foundation of the Florida Keys grant. A permanent exhibit celebrating Papio’s work is now open at Fort East Martello Museum in Key West, and preparations are already underway for next year’s kinetic festivities.  Visit KWAHS.ORG for more information.

Key West Montessori Charter School Principal Lynn Barras, Ed.M., pilots the “Peace Dove” past the Custom House Museum on Saturday. Crafted of nearly 100% recycled materials and “feathers” made from milk jugs, the fabulous fowl was one of more than thirty kinetic creations that participated in the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Stanley Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade.

 

Paula Tishok rides a playful paper mache dolphin on wheels at the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade on Saturday. More than thirty kinetic creations participated in the rolling cavalcade held in honor of late Florida Keys artist Stanley Papio, a rebellious welder-turned artist who explored recycled materials long before it was hip to be rusty.  The zany spectacle of creative whimsy and kinetic savvy was supported in part by a prestigious Knight Arts Challenge People's Choice Award and a Community Foundation of the Florida Keys grant.  A permanent exhibit celebrating Papio’s work is now open at Fort East Martello Museum in Key West, and preparations are already underway for next year’s kinetic festivities.  Visit KWAHS.ORG for more information.

Paula Tishok rides a playful paper mache dolphin on wheels at the inaugural Key West Art & Historical Society Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade on Saturday.

Facebook Comments

 May 20, 2016  Posted by at 12:48 am Art, Issue #167, What To Do  Add comments

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this. See our Privacy Policy here: https://thebluepaper.com/privacy-policy/

Close